Research. Unit x.2

Aschenputtel is the Grimm Brothers’ name for Cinderella. She is not helpless, in fact, she seems to be more of a proficient witch. This is considering she needs no help in summoning enchanted birds and wishes from a magic tree. Charles Perrault (1697), Histoires ou

contes

du temps passé, Cendrillon is the French version of the story and the closest to the one that we all think of today. It marks the introduction to most of the ‘Cinderella’ tropes such as the Fairy God Mother, the Pumpkin carriage, and the glass slipper. From Egypt we have Rhodopis; originated in first century BC/AD adapted from the Strabo, historian, 64 BC – 24 AD – this version seems to cover similar ground as the ‘germanic slave girl’ narrative however wrapped in appropriate Middle Eastern politics and social situations. In fact, it seems pretty much every country has its own variation of a similar tale.

In breaking apart the elements of the story or various versions there usually, tends to be some kind of party involved. We decided this might be a good theme to base a suggested narrative around. We don’t intend to make something with a clear linear story, we would rather build something symbolic and simplified that will allow the critic to draw meanings upon the issues we suggest. The ball is something we discussed as having great potential for working some engaging imagery and an opportunity to showcase some of the stylistic traits within William Wilde’s work. This naturally drew us towards the theater and presenting the commentary as a performance constructed in front of the audience.

I begin my environmental design research with 1910-30’s theater. I think building a stage with an authentic style and

hybridising

it with modern pastel tones will give the atmosphere a surreal re-invention of classic aesthetic; much like what we see in Wilde’s dresses.

Masquerade

ball at the Carnival of Venice. This is a great source of inspiration for ostentatious theatrics. When we think of masquerade we naturally see the key component of a mask. The tradition began as the carnival marked a time when all social classes could mingle; the masks offered anonymity and the opportunity to see within (ironically). It offered to hide association with any form of identity, origin, age, gender or religion in a society where social classes are defined and unlikely to interact.

In the client briefing, William Wilde mentioned a few of his inspirations and the message he conveys. Feminine strength and breaking the convention of acceptable fashion. I Find his exquisite use of

colour

to be

complimentary

to the concept of femininity, and a striking statement of brutality the female body endures within the industry of fashion; latex is not easy to wear. I also admire the blending of vintage cut designs with 50-70’s style patterns. The use of latex captures clean liquid shapes of bold ink, enhanced by sharp lines morphed around an organic form.

unit x comic1

The group decided to have a female form be constructed on stage and torn apart and rebuilt. It conveys the nature of the modern ‘Catwalk’ in creating and recreating aesthetic while affirming the classic transformations that occur with every respective representation of Cinderella through history. This is a storyboard of the general

visualisation

of what we build. This is unlikely how the final will look specifically as we aim to modify and redesign the composition and

colour

of the set and perhaps modify the subject that is formed into something more abstract.

Bibliography

Keenan, V. (n.d.). The Grimm Brothers’ Cinderella: Summary & Characters Chapter 3 / Lesson 29 . Retrieved from study.com: http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-grimm-brothers-cinderella-summary-characters.html

Rhodopis (The Egyptian Cinderella). (n.d.). Retrieved from lit.scribbles: https://litscribbles.wordpress.com/fairy-tales/rhodopis-the-egyptian-cinderella/

Thorpe, J. (n.d.). 9 Things About The Original Brothers Grimm Cinderella Story That Are Nothing Like The Disney Version. Retrieved from Bustle: https://www.bustle.com/articles/61053-9-things-about-the-original-brothers-grimm-cinderella-story-that-are-nothing-like-the-disney-version

wilde, w. (n.d.). Latex Dresses. Retrieved from William wilde : https://www.williamwilde.com/collections/latex-dresses?page=1

Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence by George C. Kohn (ed.), Facts. on File, Inc., New York, 1995.

 

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