Line Of Enquiry. Unit X.2

Beginning the development of ideas around our research, I began looking into William Wilde’s style and responding to some of the shapes and features that recur in his work. These are some experimental designs of patterns and styles that we could use in our own characters. I liked experimenting with mixing fabrics like some of Wilde’s inventions. I am assigned to creating an environment for our production and this gave me some ideas on using patterns to overlay textures within a stage scene.

theatres resp

Here are some more refined responses I created with the reference images of old and new theater. I had contemplated using a wide shot so an audience could be seen as silhouettes in the foreground; we could have implemented a variety of animal heads as spectators enhancing the bizarre surrealism. However, this would make the stage too small for any real detail to be used on the main subjects and leave limitations to how we could develop the camera moments later on.

Colour is a significant factor in Wilde’s work which is why I think it is crucial to get the correct compositional balance without over or under compensating. Here is a selection of colour samples I put together with reference to some of Wilde’s collections. I prefer the white and blue designs as they refer to the collection that the client presented to us at the briefing but I can see this being too bright in the scene and takes away from the subject at the center. This could be fixed with readjusting the hues and making a bolder version of the patterns on a dress that the character is wearing.

When presenting these to the group they seemed to like the yellow and black designs overall so I will use these to develop the shape composition of a border but will consider having a colour variety for the final film. Perhaps we could create a border that matched in tone or texture to the outfit worn by each character iteration. Of course, I will keep in mind that this must be toned down as not to make them overly distracting from the central characters.

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I built a mock-up of what a possible composition for the stage curtains could look like and split them into movable layers. This yellow and checkered design is the variant that my group mates preferred but we agreed this is too loud. Seeing the checkers on a much bigger screen also proves to be slightly sickening with the warped illusion. I will revise the tone and pattern in this combination but I will also look into a less basic set of assets. When looking back over mu research I have decided to explore the use of embellishments on the designs such as chains, gemstones, and lace. A want to push the grandeur of the traditional ball that may have inspired the minds of the 16th century Cinderella retold through a surreal pigmented collage.

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In our recent group meeting, we focused on what kind of characters we are going to have appeared in the scene. We didn’t want them to be real living humans so we discussed using mannequins or stitched dolls to enforce the fantastical and bizarre myth of a storybook. Of course, our version of the story will contain a little more of Wilde’s risqué appreciation of the female form and a nod to the punishment it must experience in its transformations; Cinderella’s in particular. I implemented the heads of some of the animals found in various versions of the story and picked some with traits associated with strength, fertility, sensuality and adaptability. I referred to 50’s pinup girls for engaging poses that express a range of personalities.

For the next stages of production, I will design a range of fully furnished sets and further explore the designs of the character and style we wish to convey. Perhaps overlaying animated textures and shadows will improve upon the very 2D aesthetic of the current mock up. Hopefully, we can develop a greater atmospheric depth with a collage paper vs liquid ink variety of design choices. We will also go further into appropriate music and sound that reflects the ideas that are presented.

Research. Unit x.2

Aschenputtel is the Grimm Brothers’ name for Cinderella. She is not helpless, in fact, she seems to be more of a proficient witch. This is considering she needs no help in summoning enchanted birds and wishes from a magic tree. Charles Perrault (1697), Histoires ou

contes

du temps passé, Cendrillon is the French version of the story and the closest to the one that we all think of today. It marks the introduction to most of the ‘Cinderella’ tropes such as the Fairy God Mother, the Pumpkin carriage, and the glass slipper. From Egypt we have Rhodopis; originated in first century BC/AD adapted from the Strabo, historian, 64 BC – 24 AD – this version seems to cover similar ground as the ‘germanic slave girl’ narrative however wrapped in appropriate Middle Eastern politics and social situations. In fact, it seems pretty much every country has its own variation of a similar tale.

In breaking apart the elements of the story or various versions there usually, tends to be some kind of party involved. We decided this might be a good theme to base a suggested narrative around. We don’t intend to make something with a clear linear story, we would rather build something symbolic and simplified that will allow the critic to draw meanings upon the issues we suggest. The ball is something we discussed as having great potential for working some engaging imagery and an opportunity to showcase some of the stylistic traits within William Wilde’s work. This naturally drew us towards the theater and presenting the commentary as a performance constructed in front of the audience.

I begin my environmental design research with 1910-30’s theater. I think building a stage with an authentic style and

hybridising

it with modern pastel tones will give the atmosphere a surreal re-invention of classic aesthetic; much like what we see in Wilde’s dresses.

Masquerade

ball at the Carnival of Venice. This is a great source of inspiration for ostentatious theatrics. When we think of masquerade we naturally see the key component of a mask. The tradition began as the carnival marked a time when all social classes could mingle; the masks offered anonymity and the opportunity to see within (ironically). It offered to hide association with any form of identity, origin, age, gender or religion in a society where social classes are defined and unlikely to interact.

In the client briefing, William Wilde mentioned a few of his inspirations and the message he conveys. Feminine strength and breaking the convention of acceptable fashion. I Find his exquisite use of

colour

to be

complimentary

to the concept of femininity, and a striking statement of brutality the female body endures within the industry of fashion; latex is not easy to wear. I also admire the blending of vintage cut designs with 50-70’s style patterns. The use of latex captures clean liquid shapes of bold ink, enhanced by sharp lines morphed around an organic form.

unit x comic1

The group decided to have a female form be constructed on stage and torn apart and rebuilt. It conveys the nature of the modern ‘Catwalk’ in creating and recreating aesthetic while affirming the classic transformations that occur with every respective representation of Cinderella through history. This is a storyboard of the general

visualisation

of what we build. This is unlikely how the final will look specifically as we aim to modify and redesign the composition and

colour

of the set and perhaps modify the subject that is formed into something more abstract.

Bibliography

Keenan, V. (n.d.). The Grimm Brothers’ Cinderella: Summary & Characters Chapter 3 / Lesson 29 . Retrieved from study.com: http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-grimm-brothers-cinderella-summary-characters.html

Rhodopis (The Egyptian Cinderella). (n.d.). Retrieved from lit.scribbles: https://litscribbles.wordpress.com/fairy-tales/rhodopis-the-egyptian-cinderella/

Thorpe, J. (n.d.). 9 Things About The Original Brothers Grimm Cinderella Story That Are Nothing Like The Disney Version. Retrieved from Bustle: https://www.bustle.com/articles/61053-9-things-about-the-original-brothers-grimm-cinderella-story-that-are-nothing-like-the-disney-version

wilde, w. (n.d.). Latex Dresses. Retrieved from William wilde : https://www.williamwilde.com/collections/latex-dresses?page=1

Encyclopedia of Plague and Pestilence by George C. Kohn (ed.), Facts. on File, Inc., New York, 1995.